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One Al-Shabaab kidnapper dead after former Islamists militia hunt them down

03 Jul

Interesting end to the story, but it yeilded the best possible outcome. The former Islamists group; “Ras Kamboni Brigades” who used to be the terrorist group Hizbul Islam, but have no defected Al-Shabaab and became pro-Government Militia, tracked down the kidnappers and resuced the air workers. They are now known as the Raskamboni Movement, and are allied with Kenya and Ethiopia. They have also declared Al-Qaeda and Al-Shabaab to be their mortal enemies.

Moral of the story, always assume that in these lawless regions, you will be kidnapped.

“Abdinasir Serar, a representative with the Ras Kamboni militia in Somalia, said his group heard of Friday’s kidnapping in the Dadaab refugee camp and pursued the kidnappers. Ras Kamboni fighters caught up with the kidnappers Monday morning about 60 kilometres inside Somalia.

Ras Kamboni’s leader, Ahmed Madobe, said his men killed one of the kidnappers but that the other three escaped. The rescue happened in the village of Alu Gulay.”

AP Photo/Khalil Senosi

Canadians Qurat-Ul-Ain Sadazai, left, and Steven Dennis, two of the four released foreign aid workers from the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) held hostage inside Somalia who were rescued on Monday.

NAIROBI, Kenya — Two Canadians among the four aid workers kidnapped during a deadly attack in Kenya last Friday were seasoned veterans of the business of helping the world’s poorest people, and knew the risks they faced, says one of their organization’s directors.

The aid workers were rescued Monday from inside Somalia in a daring mission that saw one of their captors killed.

“The places where the refugees are in need of humanitarian aid is very often high risk areas,” said Rolf Vestvick, director of advocacy and information for the Oslo-based Norwegian Refugee Council.

“So it is something that everybody working in this business is aware of.”

In fact, Qurat-Ul-Ain Sadazai of Gatineau, Que., has spent years in some of the world’s most troubled regions.

The unassuming 38-year-old Pakistani-born woman had just returned to Kenya in February to take on the role of deputy director of the NRC’s operations in Somalia and Kenya. She had worked there from 2007 until 2010, leaving for a couple of years to head up the agency’s operations in Peshawar, Pakistan.

Steven Dennis, 37, was relatively new to NRC, having worked for the agency in Kenya for the past year. But the tall, dark-haired Toronto native, too, had a lengthy background in humanitarian work with other agencies, including Doctors Without Borders.

Released aid workers Qurat-Ul-Ain Sadazai, 38, a Canadian citizen of Pakistani origin, center-left, Glenn Costes of the Philippines, 40, center-right, Steven Dennis of Canada, 37, above-center-right, and Astrid Sehl of Norway, 33, 3rd-right, arrive back by Kenyan military helicopter at Wilson airport in Nairobi, Kenya, Monday, July 2, 2012.

Sadazai and Dennis, along with Astrid Sehl, 33, of Norway, and Glenn Costes, a Filipino and eldest among the group at 40, were kidnapped at gunpoint from Kenya’s sprawling Dadaab refugee camp.

Smiling and waving as they touched the ground, all four arrived back in Kenya’s capital aboard a military helicopter on Monday after a pro-government Somali militia group rescued the four inside Somalia.

“We are happy. We are back. We are alive and we are happy this has ended,” Sadazai said after the group landed in Nairobi.

They were lucky to be alive. Their Kenyan driver, Abdi Ali, was killed when four gunmen attacked their two-vehicle convoy on Friday.

Two other local NRC employees were injured. The gunmen took one of the two vehicles and the four workers. The group later abandoned the vehicle and began walking toward the Somali border.

The aid group originally arranged to have armed security travel with the convoy, but the security arrangements were cancelled at the last minute over concerns that armed guards might attract unwanted attention.

“Convoys which have these armed escorts … [are] more likely to be attacked by roadside bombs,” said Vestvik in explaining why the decision was made.

After an attack on a Doctors Without Borders convoy last year in which two Spanish women were abducted, some aid groups began using security escorts in Dadaab, a series of sprawling camps connected by sandy roads.

Released foreign aid workers from the Norweigan Refugee Council (L-R) Steven Dennis of Canada, Canadian citizen Qurat-Ul-Ain Sadazai, Astrid Sehl of Norway and Glenn Costes of Philippines wave upon arriving at the Wilson airport in Nairobi July 2, 2012.

Canadian officials expressed relief at news of the rescue Monday and thanked officials in Kenya and Somalia for their help in handling the crisis.

“We are elated by the safe rescue of Canadian citizens taken hostage in Kenya,” a spokesman for Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada said in an email.

Jean-Bruno Villeneuve said the High Commission in Nairobi would provide support for the Canadian workers.

Elisabeth Rasmusson, the aid group’s secretary general, told a news conference in Oslo, the Norwegian capital, that she was relieved the four had been released.

Rasmusson was present during Friday’s attack but was not harmed or taken. She said Friday that the attack happened on a main road toward the city of Dadaab in “what is recognized as the safe part of the camp.” Dadaab is the world’s largest refugee camp with a growing population that has swelled recently to roughly 464,000 people.

Abdinasir Serar, a representative with the Ras Kamboni militia in Somalia, said his group heard of Friday’s kidnapping in the Dadaab refugee camp and pursued the kidnappers. Ras Kamboni fighters caught up with the kidnappers Monday morning about 60 kilometres inside Somalia.

Ras Kamboni’s leader, Ahmed Madobe, said his men killed one of the kidnappers but that the other three escaped. The rescue happened in the village of Alu Gulay.

The four rescued workers were taken to the Somali town of Dhobley and were then flown to Nairobi. Ras Kamboni works alongside Somali government and Kenyan military forces. Kenya sent troops to Somalia last October to hunt al-Shabab militants.

via One kidnapper killed in daring Somali rescue mission that saved two Canadian aid workers | News | National Post.

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Posted by on July 3, 2012 in Somalia

 

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